The Ive Doctrine: Complexity within Simplicity, Part 2

“Why do we assume that simple is good? Because with physical products, we have to feel we can dominate them. As you bring order to complexity, you find a way to make the product defer to you. Simplicity isn’t just a visual style. It’s not just minimalism or the absence of clutter. It involves digging through the depth of the complexity. To be truly simple, you have to go really deep. For example, to have no screws on something, you can end up having a product that is so convoluted and so complex. The better way is to go deeper with the simplicity, to understand everything about it and how it’s manufactured. You have to deeply understand the essence of a product in order to be able to get rid of the parts that are not essential.”

(From Steve Jobs, by Walter Isaacson)

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The Ive Doctrine: Complexity within Simplicity, Part 1

“Why do we assume that simple is good? Because with physical products, we have to feel we can dominate them. As you bring order to complexity, you find a way to make the product defer to you. Simplicity isn’t just a visual style. It’s not just minimalism or the absence of clutter. It involves digging through the depth of the complexity. To be truly simple, you have to go really deep. For example, to have no screws on something, you can end up having a product that is so convoluted and so complex. The better way is to go deeper with the simplicity, to understand everything about it and how it’s manufactured. You have to deeply understand the essence of a product in order to be able to get rid of the parts that are not essential.”

(From Steve Jobs, by Walter Isaacson)

Read the rest of this entry »


Mantis

Praying Mantis

I am really fascinated by the praying mantis. It is an expert hunter with an incredible gift of patience. Those things will perfectly sit and watch the same prey for hours, waiting for it to avert its attention or lower its defenses. Then, when the perfect opportunity has arisen, it will lunge and grab its prey with its strong claws.

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My mind is full…

“I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things, so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it.” ~Sherlock Holmes, A Study in Scarlet

I am beginning to wonder whether Holmes really has a point with this statement. I have reached the point in this semester that I dread the most. Each semester around week 10 or 11, I hit a wall. It feels as though my brain has reached its maximum capacity. I have a harder time remaining interested in obtaining new knowledge. I have so many things running through my conscious thought processes that I am unable to adequately concentrate on any one thing for any period of time at all. Read the rest of this entry »


My favorite quote from Steve Jobs

As I’m sure, most of you have heard that Steve Jobs – founder of Apple and the essential catalyst for the modern tech industry – passed away today. He had been fighting pancreatic cancer for roughly seven years.

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I guess procrastination really does pay off.

This Tuesday, I was scheduled to give a speech on the Family and Medical Leave Act in front of my Business Law class. Naturally, I spent about three hours the night before writing the outline, putting together notes, and practiced said speech. By the time I got to school the next morning, I felt strong, confident, and fully prepared.

Not.

My physical and mental condition was closer to sleepy and vibrating.

As I was waiting in the hallway for my class to start, I overheard the other students talking about the visual aid that they had prepared. Curious, I asked them if visual aid was one of the requirements for the class. Turns out, it was.

Dang.

I’d completely forgotten about that part.

Thinking quickly, I pulled out my trusty MacBook and opened up iPhoto. Since my speech opened with a story about my Dad’s health complications last summer, I found a picture of him. Borrowing a classmate’s flash drive, I loaded the picture into the projector PC and put it on the screen while I gave my speech.

My final grade? 100%.

I guess procrastination really does pay off.


Christians don’t have to be dumb.

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I live in an area that focuses very heavily on what people smarter than me like to refer to as “folk religion.” I like to define folk religion as “Faith made completely from anecdotes.” By this, I mean that everything that an individual knows and believes about God comes from one-liners repeated by generation after generation of those wonderful old Sunday School teachers who are quoting something said by their Sunday School teacher when they were a kid, which has no foundation in Scripture, up-to-date Scientific evidence, or the greater theological tradition as laid down by the Apostles or the early Church Fathers. From folk religion come statements like this:

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